St John Ambulance statistics

 

Key statistics

  • Every year, we train around 400,000 people in life saving skills through our training programmes.
  • In 2015, we trained 262,800 people through the workplace
  •  In 2015, we provided fully trained and equipped personnel at more than 30,000 events
  • In 2015, 190,000 students watched The Big First Aid Lesson Live
  • In 2015, there were over 3.4 million visits to our website, containing our essential free first aid information

General statistics

  • Fewer than one in 10 people have the skills to save a life

    [St John Ambulance Census Feb 2014*]

  • Our research says less than one in five of us (18%) knows even basic first aid [Helpless stats (research from 2012)] 

  • 97% of people feel it is important to know first aid, yet half do not have the confidence in their skills to save a life [St John Ambulance Census Feb 2014]

  • One in two parents feel helpless in an emergency situation [St John Ambulance Census Feb 2014]

  • 62% of parents say knowing first aid skills would make them feel more prepared for parenthood

  • Only 38% of households have a first aid kit at home. Of those, only 8% check the kit. [St John Ambulance Census Feb 2014]

Schools and young people

  • Almost 60% of children have no first aid training whatsoever [St John Ambulance Census Feb 2014]
  • 97% of teachers think learning first aid is important, but only 21% offer it in their schools [Big First Aid Lesson stats (YouGov Poll 2014)]
  • 190,000 school children viewed the Big First Aid Lesson Live in June 2015
  • We trained 18,000 young people not in education, employment or training through our RISE project in 2015
  • Just under half of the young people trained through RISE shared their first aid knowledge with others within 12 months of being trained
  • Nearly a third of young people trained through RISE had used their first aid to help others within 12 months of being trained
  • 54% of young people engaged with RISE through volunteering went from Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET) to in Employment, Education or Training (EET).
  • In 2015, more than 140,000 young people received first aid training at school
  • 8,500 school pupils received first aid training from St John Ambulance thanks to our partnership with Babcock International in 2015.

Community first aid

  • Every year, around 30,000 adults attend one of our community first aid courses
  • Every year, we train around 400,000 people in life saving skills through our training programmes
  • During Save a Life September 2015, we held over 323 first aid demos across the country
  • In 2015, we distributed over 670,000 first aid guides to provide more people with first aid advice at their fingertips
  • In 2015, there were over 1,000,000 views of our first aid advice videos
  • In 2015, there were 10.7 million views of The Chokeables, our campaign showing people how to save a baby from choking
  • 46 parents told us that they saved their baby from choking as a direct result of our campaign The Chokeables in 2015.

First aid in the workplace

  • St John Ambulance teaches first aid to more people than any other organisation
  • Each year, we offer over 20,000 courses, taking place at over 240 venues

  • In 2015, we trained 262,800 people through the workplace

Service provision

  • We administer first aid to 90,000 people at events each year
  • We provide first aid coverage at 30,000 events across the country
  • In 2015, our volunteers gave more than 1,000,000 hours to provide first aid at events.

Other

  • In 2015, there were over 3.4 million visits to our website
  • In 2015, more than £110,500 was raised through our Donate for Defibs fundraising appeal – the equivalent to 110 defibrillators to be used where they are needed the most.
  • 3,370 pieces of media coverage that directly educated or signposted to first aid advice were secured in 2015.

 

* The St John Ambulance Census is an annual survey we use to produce a ‘state of the nation’ report into first aid trends.

 

 

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